Goals

for John Barber's classes

Learning Goals

This course is aligned with my Personal Teaching Goals, several CMDC Program Learning Goals (NOTE: There will be a test in your Senior Seminar course about how you connected to each of these ten goals.), the CMDC Program Five Standards of Excellence, and several WSU Learning Goals.

Personal Teaching Goals

  • Promote collaborative inquiry and transformative learning via activity-centered and hands-on projects.
  • Encourage critical thinking by examining outcomes compared to desired results.
  • Investigate using digital media to solve problems, critique solutions, and communicate knowledge.
  • Pursue systematic inquiry by devising and testing new procedures, solutions, and applications.
  • Apply learning to a developing body of knowledge.
  • Shift learning and practice from personal artifact to community problem solving.

CMDC Learning Goals

Goal 1: Demonstrate competency with computers for designing, distributing, researching, retrieving, and preserving digital works in various mediums for humane and effective human-computer interactions.
  • Produce web pages and other digital interfaces and/or environments for effective and functional human-computer interactions.
  • Apply Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to hand-coded web pages.
  • Employ web and other digital interfaces and/or environments that respond to specific audience needs, as well as usability and accessibility issues.
  • Learn various methods of researching for online information, such as databases, wikis, and websites, and of evaluating its credibility.

Aligned to:
University Goals: Creative & Critical Thinking; Information Literacy; Depth, Breadth, & Integration of Learning
DTC Courses: DTC 201, DTC 335, DTC 336, DTC 355, DTC 356, DTC 435, DTC 477, DTC 478, DTC 497

Goal 2: Synthesize media forms for multimedia contexts
  • Organize multimedia for web pages and other digital interfaces and/or environments using various graphics, sound, and video authoring tools.
  • Develop a multimedia project that incorporates various media objects, such as video, animation, sound, and still images.

Aligned to:
University Goals: Creative & Critical Thinking; Information Literacy; Communication; Depth, Breadth, & Integration of Learning
DTC Courses: DTC 201, DTC 335, DTC 354, DTC 355, DTC 435, DTC 477, DTC 497

Goal 3: Employ the principles for sophisticated manipulation of various forms of digital media
  • Practice visual fundamentals such as composition, figure/ground relationships, rhythm, contrast, and color.
  • Create and compare print and screen based media, understanding the affordances and constraints of each in the production of visual, sonic, haptic, kinetic, and kinesthetic elements.
  • Create and arrange images and other content in sequence and in non-linear form, demonstrating the conceptual underpinnings of the digital image and its application to time-based media.
  • Utilize textual content as visual rhetoric in the process of designing interactive media interfaces that are both functional and usable.

Aligned to:
University Goals: Creative & Critical Thinking; Information Literacy; Communication
DTC Courses: DTC 201, DTC 335, DTC 336, DTC 354, DTC 435

Goal 4: Understand the production and assessment of media objects
  • Understand basics of front end design as well as composition strategies for digital texts and environments.
  • Demonstrate an overall understanding and utilization of appropriate textual content for various forms of interactive media.
  • Produce and evaluate effective textual content that promotes interaction, functionality, and usability by different readers and needs.

Aligned to:
University Goals: Creative & Critical Thinking; Information Literacy
DTC Courses: DTC 201, DTC 335, DTC 336, DTC 354, DTC 355, DTC 435, DTC 477, DTC 497, DTC 478

Goal 5: Know the basics of information architecture and knowledge management along with ways digital information can be structured for retrieval and archival purposes for different audiences
  • Examine the structure and culture of the disciplines, publishing cycles, and information flows control access to information.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how storage and retrieval systems control what information can be found.
  • Use a variety of advanced techniques, such as Boolean searching, subject/descriptor searching, truncation, and proximity, to retrieve information effectively from a variety of electronic information retrieval systems, like subscription databases and the Web
  • Understand the use of language and vocabulary in information retrieval by exploring thesauri, indexes, concordances, and keyword-matching, as well as demonstrate comprehension of the differences, uses, and strengths of these various ways of using language to retrieve electronic information

Aligned to:
University Goals: Creative & Critical Thinking; Information Literacy
DTC Courses: DTC 101, DTC 356, DTC 497

Goal 6: Question the way digital media functions in multiple cultural contexts

A. Examine the presentation of race, class, gender, and disabilities in digital media.
B. Interpret images found on the web from a cultural context different from your own.

Aligned to:
University Goals: Diversity
DTC Courses: DTC 101, DTC 475, DTC 497

Goal 7: Recognize various forms of language processing and their implications for media authoring

A. Use digital media terminology and concepts, such as medium, media, multimedia, mass media, remediation, repurposing, translation, text, textuality, language, and code, appropriately in presentations and projects
B. Employ various types of texts, such as visual, auditory, kinetic, and kinesthetic texts, for appropriate mediums
C. Illustrate the way artificial systems acquire language
D. Demonstrate knowledge about the process by which is language is made via computers
E. Study, create, and critique digital text and its central role in human-computer interactions
F. Employ textual content in web pages and other digital interfaces or environments that respond to specific audience needs

Aligned to:
University Goals: Creative & Critical Thinking; Information Literacy
DTC Courses: DTC 101, DTC 336, DTC 354, DTC 375, DTC 497

Goal 8: Appreciate the history of technological development, from local to global perspectives, and its implications for a variety of mediums

A. Demonstrate understanding between digital and analog technologies
B. Compare and contrast technological development from a historical perspective
C. Explain contributions of pioneers working in the US and beyond in the area of digital technology
D. Discuss technologies of oral and written discourse, such as the importance of memory, the development of alphabets, invention of writing tools, and innovations for electronic devices
E. Examine the way in which metaphors from print culture influence electronic information retrieval systems

Aligned to:
University Goals: Information Literacy; Depth, Breadth, & Integration of Learning
DTC Courses: DTC 101, DTC 375, DTC 476, DTC 497

Goal 9: Utilize an interdisciplinary perspective in order to understand the basics of social, economic, and education changes brought about by digital media

A. Demonstrate knowledge of "digital divide" by explaining the various factors leading to it in the US and beyond
B. Sketch an activity, program, or event that aims to assist marginalized populations with gaining access and understanding of digital media
C. Write a cultural critique of media objects that looks at political economy, content, and audience reception of media objects
D. Discuss "authority," and the way information is and has been validated; interrogate the role of culture and technology in determining the validity and authority of information
E. Note the way in which public policies impact access to information
F. Create, and use information ethically

Aligned to:
University Goals: Scientific Literacy; Diversity
DTC Courses: DTC 101, DTC 475, DTC 497

Goal 10: Be practiced and capable communicators in all mediums

A. Create a digital text in a variety of mediums.
B. Construct and deliver an argument focusing on the way the medium affects the message, audience, and other rhetorical components.
C. Evaluate the effective use of language in a digital text.

Aligned to:
University Goals: Information Literacy; Communication
DTC Courses: DTC 101, DTC 201, DTC 335, DTC 354, DTC 355, DTC 356, DTC 375, DTC 475, DTC 477, DTC 478, DTC 497

CMDC Standards

This course is aligned with the CMDC Program Standards of Excellence, which are designed to foster student success. These Standards of Excellence are as follows.

  • Envision, imagine and invent digital media objects that do not yet exist in the world and, in creating them, understand the importance to reflect upon their potential impact upon the people and cultures for which they are made and by which they will be used.
  • Engage in the rigorous examination of assumptions and values about the self, others, and the world in order to advance knowledge and promote wisdom for bettering the environment and human condition.
  • Communicate ideas and viewpoints clearly, elegantly, and creatively with a variety of technologies and modes of expression.
  • Delight in discovery and experimentation, recognizing that leadership in innovation demands courage and curiosity and requires an understanding of many forms of and approaches to knowledge.

WSU Learning Goals

WSU maintains seven Learning Goals and Outcomes. The following are connected to this course. Learn more about WSU Learning Goals and Outcomes.

#1: Critical and creative thinking

Students will use reason, evidence, and context to increase knowledge, to reason ethically, and to innovate in imaginative ways.

At course end, students should be able to

Locate, synthesize, interpret, and evaluate a wide variety of digital and print-based texts.
Produce an informative or expressive multimodal text developed through effective research.
See the bigger ideas that several points may have in common; understand how ideas of varying levels of abstraction might connect; understand how some ideas may not be properly compared or used synonymously, and others can; detect and exploit themes and relationships among points of view, theses, and evidence.

Course components that advance this learning goal

Readings and projects for Weeks 1-16

How will this goal be evaluated?

Reading, discussion, quizzes, projects, professor evaluation, and more.

#4: Information literacy

Students will use a disciplined and systematic approach to accessing, evaluating, and using information.

At course end, students should be able to

Identify, explain, compare, apply, argue, interpret, and evaluate information in a variety of digital forms.
Create multimodal texts using digital methods.
Determine the nature and extent of information needed for purpose-specific communication activities; plan effectively to research and gather needed information.

Course components that advance this learning goal

Readings and projects for Weeks 1-16

How will this goal be evaluated?

Reading, discussion, quizzes, projects, professor evaluation, and more.

#5: Communication

Students will write, speak, and listen to achieve intended and meaningful undestanding.

At course end, students should be able to

Communicate in various "authored" digital formats and both formal and informal speech to convey meaning, significance, views, and values in peer groups and beyond.
Organize thoughts into a succinct yet comprehensive message expressing both concrete and abstract ideas.
Express ideas textually and visually in coherent, concise, and technically correct forms effective with audiences in a variety of digital multimodial texts.
Engage effectively with diverse groups through listening and speaking one-on-one, in small groups, and in large groups.

Course components that advance this learning goal

All modules in the course include in-class discussion of readings. Some classes include writing activities. Some include student presentations. All these activities foster communication goals.

How will this goal be evaluated?

Professor evaluation.

#6: Diversity

Students will understand cultural differences and similarities by exploring the multiplicity of individual and group experiences in various historical periods, societies, and cultures.

At course end, students should be able to

Recognize how digital media impacts cultural systems and socioeconomic differences in the US and beyond; can influence stereotyping of others; is used to impose and break down power and privilege.
Exhibit sensitivity to social, cultural, and intellectual interests, listening styles, and needs of any audience.

Course components that advance this learning goal

Readings and projects for Weeks 1-16

How will this goal be evaluated?

Reading, discussion, quizzes, projects, professor evaluation, and more.

#7: Depth, breadth, and integration of learning

Students will develop depth, breadth, and integration of learning for the benefit of themselves, their communities, their employers, and for society at large.

At course end, students should be able to

Demonstrate an integration of history, core methods, techniques, vocabularies, problem solving approaches, and unsolved problems.
Understand how methods and concepts of course relate to those of other disciplines; ability to engage in cross-disciplinary activities.

Course components that advance this learning goal

Readings and projects for Weeks 1-16

How will this goal be evaluated?

Reading, discussion, quizzes, projects, professor evaluation, and more.