techne_lab

Techne_Lab Interview

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Overview | Details | Exhibitions | Background

Overview

Techne_Lab Interview is a conversation about sound-rich narratives with Internet artist and writer Mark Amerika, alongside Boulder Creek, Boulder, Colorado. The dialogue creates a metanarrative investigating what kinds of immersive listening experiences can be created using audio source material as the primary component of storytelling and how sound narrative can be a form of electronic literature.

Details

Object: audio file
Format: mp3
Bit Rate: 356kbs
Duration: 17:58
Created: 2016
Creator: John F. Barber, Mark Amerika, and Ryan Ruehlen

Exhibitions / Publications / Broadcasts

  • Narrative Currents
    peer reviewed publication
    MATLIT (Materialities of Literature), Vox Media: Sound in Literature special issue, vol. 5, no. 1, 2017. DOI: https://doi.org/10.14195/2182-8830
  • techne_lab techne_lab EP4: Narrative Currents
    invited interview
    University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado
    31 March 2016
    An interview with Mark Amerika, recorded beside Boulder Creek, was mixed for the podcast by Ryan Ruehlen.

Background

techne_lab is an experimental dialogue around practice-based research realized as a limited run academic journal, a finite podcast, a sequence of affective audio essays, and an archive of philosophical source material for future forms of postproduction art. Each episode features voices of artist-educators affiliated with the Intermedia Art, Writing and Performance (IWAP) program at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Led by Mark Amerika and PhD candidate Ryan Ruelhen, techne_lab works in conjunction with the doctoral program in Intermedia Art, Writing and Performance (IWAP) at the University of Colorado-Boulder. The lab is focused on inventing new forms of knowledge associated with intermedia art, writing, and performance as well as emerging modes of scholarly thought. The purpose is to create and collect experimental dialogues focused on practice-based research and archive them as philosophical source materials for future forms of post-production art.

As the publication abstract reads, "this interview remixes the natural sounds of Boulder Creek (where the dialogue takes place) with some of the random urban noise and background ambience of the nearby thoroughfare. Ruptures in language indicate an intentional manipulation of the source material and useful postproduction techniques such as feedback and repetition highlight the affective qualities of the act of listening and deciphering. Meanwhile the dialogue itself creates its own metanarrative investigating what kinds of immersive listening experiences can be created using audio source material as the primary component of storytelling and how sound narrative can be a form of electronic literature."